Category: Capsize

Soby

Soby

 

Soby
Photo: expressodasilhas.sapo.cv

The 55 meter long, 471 dwt ro-ro passenger ferry Soby capsized at Mindelo, Sao Vincente Island, Cape Verde. The Soby was unloading containers when one container slid on the vessel’s deck. The ferry continued to tilt with a heavy list to port. All the crew evacuated the Soby before it capsized and partially sank on its port side hull.

There are no reports of water pollution, but authorities are monitoring the area for leaks. Salvage operations will begin on the next high tide. Reports state the vessel had over 1oo tons of cargo still on board at the time.

 

LCT Marc Jason III

LCT Marc Jason III

LCT Marc Jason III
Photo: abs-cbn.com

On March 21, the 85 meter long cargo vessel LCT Marc Jason III capsized and sank off  the shore of Malabuyoc, Cebu, Philippines. The LCT Marc Jason III was headed to Bantayan Island from Tampi, Amlan with a cargo of sand. As the vessel was off Malabuyoc, it began to list.  The LCT Marc Jason III berthed at Malabuyoc where it continued to list forcing all 17 crew abandoned ship.  No reports of injuries.

The following day, the LCT Marc  Jason III capsized completely and sank just 50 meters from the shore. No reports of pollution released, but local authorities are concern that pollution may be released if the vessel isn’t salvaged quickly.

LCT Marc Jason III
Photo: flickr
Kum San

Kum San

The 132 meter long, 8576 dwt cargo vessel Kum San capsized and sank off Lianyuanhang, China. The Kum San was at anchor when it was struck by a bunkering tanker.  The tanker was maneuovering when it struck into the hull of the Kum San. The Kum San suffered a large breach below the waterline causing uncontrolled water ingress.

The cargo vessel developed a severe list forcing the crew to abandon ship into a lifeboat. All 27 crew of the Kum San were rescued by Chinese Coast Guard assisted by nearby ships. No reports of injuries.

The Kum San continued to list until it capsized and sank just a few hours after the collision. Authorities are monitoring the area for pollution. Reports state the Kum San had several tons of fuel on board when it sank.

Initial investigations found the Kum San transponder was either malfunctioning or turned off which may be the leading factor why the vessels collided. The Kum San was thought to be loaded with cargo of possibly coal and had been at anchor for over a week.