Trec’her

The 20 meter long fishing vessel Trec’her went aground on Batz Island, France.   The trawler sent out a distress call with the French authorities dispatching a SNSM lifeboat and a Naval helicopter to the scene.  The lifeboat reached the scene and found the trawler to close to rocks to allow the lifeboat to approach.   The helicopter arrived and was able to hoist the five crew off the Trec’her to safety.  The men were transported to hospital to be evaluated.   Authorities dispatched a pollution control vessel to the scene.   The Trec’her had six tons of diesel fuel in its tanks when it went aground.

Update:

The vessel sank on March 6 after a storm swept across the area.   The vessel had been laying on its side since going aground.  Waves had washed away much of the equipment before the vessel sunk during high tide.   Local authorities have stated that debris from the trawler has washed ashore around the island.   Restrictions to fishing has been imposed as the six tons of fuel was released into the water.

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TRA LY 18

The 46 meter long, 907 dwt coastal freighter Tra Ly 18 sank in the Gulf of Tonkin near Vinh, Vietnam.   The freighter was en route to Quang Ngai from Hai Phongwith 500 tons of bulk cement when it suffered water ingress.   The crew was unable to stop the flooding and sent out a distress call.   A nearby freighter, Hoang Vu 1, responded and rescued all crewmen from the Tra Ly 18.   No reports of injuries.   There are conflicting reports to number of crew reported on board the Tra Ly 18 (8 to 18 persons).

 

 

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MSC Carole

The 294 meter long, 60639 dwt container vessel MSC Carole went aground on a reef near Jakarta, Indonesia (-6° 1′ 35.904″, 106° 53′ 12.4794″).  The MSC Carole was en route to Jakarta from Fremantle when it struck the reef near the entrance to the harbor.  The vessel was proceeding at 7.5 knots and is firmly stuck on the reef.  Initial attempts to refloat the vessel failed.   Reports state there is no sign of any fuel or pollution being released.  The reason why the MSC Carole struck the reef has not yet been reported.  The MSC Carole is the second largest container vessel currently operating in the world.

 

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